Category Archives: Uncategorized

Corporate Finance Blogs - Blog Catalog Blog Directory

Advertisements

I did it my way..

RNIA.org: Reputation Management

via LinkedIn: Blog Link

Is your reputation at stake? Then learn to manage it.
A good reputation is the product of consistent and positive interactions built up over time. Establishing a good reputation is straightforward: make and keep commitments and attract the positive perceptions of the people who know you. Specific ways of making and keeping commitments, and gathering positive perceptions.
While the concepts of commitment and perception are easily grasped, the key to establishing a good reputation is to apply them as effectively as possible. Commitment and perception are two types of interactions that generate relationship capital. Relationship Capital generates reputation.
Building a good reputation is the product of consistent and positive interactions built up over time. A good reputation is forged by productive conversations and following through with commitments.
So what kind of actions will help you building a strong reputation?
Character and attitude is the ultimate reputation builders, doing what you committed to. An easy motto is to practice is to underpromise and overdeliver. Also, be willing to admit when you are wrong and to rectify a problem will win you the loyalty of friends and colleagues alike.
When you present yourself in the best light, whether virtually or physically, people get a sense of your own self respect. A groomed appearance, genuine interest in the people you come into contact with, clear communication style and a positive attitude will do much to foster your reputation in anothers mind.

The thing to understand about your reputation is that it precedes and follows you everywhere. As you start out in life and begin building your reputation, people tend remember you with every exchange they have and you want that to be as positive as possible. If you acquire a bad reputation, it can seriously impact your professional prospects. People need to know you are trustworthy. If you establish reputation as an ethical and responsive person, the likelihood that people will put opportunities in your path are greatly increased.

Recommended Site

One of the visitors on my site linked me here:

http://www.apersonalfinancesguide.com

I think it has a good selection of reads on personal finance and is a must visit.

Financial Meltdown & Investment Risk « Simple Life (daddyblog)

Financial Meltdown & Investment Risk

November 11, 2008 by albechong

The recent financial meltdown got many investor burned their pocket. Some of the blue chip investment companies where transaction are in billions like Lehman, Freddie Mac, Fannie Mae, AIG have been wiped out almost of their capital due to crisis.

Below here are some of the capital loses as compare to their peak a year ago.

* A I G -Then: $178.8 billion… Now: $5.46 billion. Down 96.95%

* Bank of America -Then: $236.5 billion… Now: $123.4 billion. Down: 47.82%

* Citigroup -Then: $236.7 billion… Now: $76.34 billion. Down 67.75%

* Merrill Lynch – Then: $63.9 billion… Now: $30.2 billion. Down 52.74%

* Fannie Mae – Then: $64.8 billion… Now: $0.45 billion. Down 99.3%

* Morgan Stanley – Then: $73.1 billion… Now: $41.1 billion. Down 43.78%

* Wachovia – Then: $98.3 billion… Now: $19.44 billion. Down 80.22%

* JP Morgan Chase – Then: $161 billion… Now: $130.2 billion. Down 19.13%

* Capital One Financial – Then: $29.9 billion… Now: $16.9 billion. Down 43.48%

* Washington Mutual – Then: $31.1 billion… Now: $3.64 billion. Down 88.3%

* Lehman Bros. – Then: $34.4 billion… Now: $0.80 billion. Down 97.6%

* Goldman Sachs – Then: 97.7 billion… Now: $40.6 billion. Down 58.7%

* Wells Fargo – Then: $124.1 billion… Now: $111.25 billion. Down 10.35%

* National City – Then: $16.4 billion… Now: $2.8 billion. Down 83%

* Fifth Third Bancorp – Then: $18.8 billion… Now: $7.9 billion. Down 57.6%

* American Express – Then: $74.8 billion… Now: $37.5 billion. Down 49.87%

* Freddie Mac – Then: $41.5 billion… Now: $0.16 billion. Down 58.7%

* Suntrust Banks – Then: $27 billion… Now: $16.07 billion. Down 58.7%

* BB&T – Then: $23.2 billion… Now: $18.4 billion. Down 20.69%

* Marshall & Ilsley – Then: $11.6 billion… Now: $4.48 billion. Down 61.3%

* Keycorp – Then: $13.2 billion… Now: $5.68 billion. Down 56.97%

* Legg Mason- Then: $11.4 billion…Now: $4.96 billion. Down 56.49%

* Comerica- Then: $8.3 billion…Now: $4.74 billion. Down 42.89%

* Countrywide Financial: Then: $11.1 billion…Now: $0.00 billion. Down 100%

* Bear Stearns- Then: $14.8 billion…Now: $ 0.00 billion. Down 100%

via Financial Meltdown & Investment Risk « Simple Life

Fannie Mae May Need More Than Billion From U.S. – Mergers, Acquisitions, Venture Capital, Hedge Funds — DealBook – New York Times

Fannie Mae said Monday that it might need more than the $100 billion that the Treasury said it was willing to invest in the giant mortgage company to help it stay in business.

“If we continue to experience substantial losses in future periods or to the extent that we experience a liquidity crisis that prevents us from accessing the unsecured debt markets, this commitment may not be sufficient to keep us in solvent condition or from being placed into receivership,” Fannie Mae said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Fannie Mae reported earlier Monday that it lost $29 billion in the third quarter. It said the number of loans in its portfolio that were in foreclosure or delinquent by more than three months had jumped to 1.72 percent in September.

via Fannie Mae May Need More Than Billion From U.S. – Mergers, Acquisitions, Venture Capital, Hedge Funds — DealBook – New York Times

Goldman pegs India’s FY09 growth at 6.7% – Economy and Politics – livemint.com

New Delhi: Goldman Sachs cut its growth forecast for India citing “larger-than-expected shock” to the financial sector over the last couple of months, and its knock-on effects on both domestic and external demand.

The brokerage lowered its GDP growth numbers for FY09 to 6.7% from 7.5% and for FY10 to 5.8% from 7%, Goldman said in a research note on Monday.

“We believe there is little fiscal room for additional stimulus in FY10. We expect growth to trough at a quarterly pace of 5.0% in the April-June quarter of FY10, before recovering to 6.6% by end-FY10. The slowdown, in our view, is very much cyclical in nature,” the brokerage said.

Goldman Sachs said the gathering financial crisis over the past several weeks has affected India’s financial sector significantly, with both domestic and external liquidity drying up. This has impacted the financing for corporates, loans for households, and trade credit for exporters.

Goldman believes the large global and domestic financial sector shock will continue to slow activity across the board, in capex plans, exports growth, and consumption demand.

According to the note, corporates will be hurt. This will in turn impact investment and external demands, and slow down consumption. On the production side, a significant slowdown in construction and real estate, and in industry is expected.

However, the brokerage sees a silver lining. “A large monetary policy stimulus, prospects of a good agricultural crop supporting rural demand, lower commodity prices, and ongoing infrastructure spending would limit further downside to growth,” it said.

via Goldman pegs India’s FY09 growth at 6.7% – Economy and Politics – livemint.com

A you tube video from outer space

Why the Liquidity crisis in India?

Why the Liquidity crisis in India?

We are after all not extending credit, NPAs are up only by 1-1.5% at most banks, and we have already released 3 Lac crores ( INR 3 Trillion) thru cuts in CRR, SLR and changes in regulation on secured collateral borrowings. Corporates may be squeezed but where have the interbank market funds gone, as banks are seeing a steady decline in the amounts they have in cash, without any linked repatriation or credit offtake. I think at the maximum only INR 1 Trillion ( tops) would have been reduction in deposits! One component which shd be not all the answer, would be the purchase of Dollars by RBI to shore up the falling rupee.

There is going to be a further CRR cut before December, commentators indicating as much as 150 points, but I think someone should think about getting more out of the SLR which is a largish 25% , 23% with all the current cuts effected and which should provide liquidity against a long stated grouse of the global players.

Banks are thus sitting on a lot of money but with recession prospects firming up in each sector, it is unlikely that credit will roll out anytime soon. A lot of the money should be expected in high yield junk investments yet again and that will remain a matter of concern.